Monday, February 15, 2016

Valentine's Recap

We had an absolutely lovely Valentine's Day.  Y let me sleep in and when I woke up, he gave me a Valentine's basket.  He had small chocolate gifts for the kiddos.  I cleaned out his pick-up as a gift to him.  We took the kids to a movie in the afternoon, Kung Fu Panda 3.  The movie was really good. Lil G made roaring sounds at the screen during the fight scenes and yelled Panda Bear at one point.  I took Punk to figure skating last evening.  When we came home, Y had prepared seafood pasta with spicy marinara and scallops.  It was so good!

We have a dilemma in our house.  Y wants to split our tax return and essentially spend it on whatever we want.  It would be about $1000 apiece.  I don't want to so that as I think its a waste of money.  He wants a new gun and ammunition reloading equipment.  He thinks that overall we save too much money and need to live for today.  He is sick of me being cheap and wants to spend without answering to me.  We rarely disagree about money but are definitely not in agreement about this one.  What do you think?  Do I need to lighten up?

10 comments:

  1. Balance is important. Do you think purchase of a new gun and reloading equipment is a waste of money, or the fact that you are taking this windfall and spending it instead of saving it? In my mind those are two separate, completely different issues. If Y has been wanting these purchases for awhile and they have not made it to the budget as a savings priority, he may have a valid concern about prioritizing wants and needs. However, if this is kind of an impulse desire based on the windfall availability, perhaps some additional discussion is in order. Compromise could be to save/invest half and spend half on Y's desires, assuming you can overcome your feeling that is is a waste of money. For me that's the biggest issue - figuring out a way for both of your to be happy about the decision, even if the only reason you're happy is because he is happy. Good luck!

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    1. After reading the comments, I realized that I need to give more background info. The reloading equipment would save money but I'm against it for safety reasons. Several years ago, my brother shot a rifle with a reloaded shell. Something was wrong with the shell and it blew the gun in half. He wasn't hurt but it could have been catastrophic. Y knows this and thinks I have an irrational fear. I might be but I would rather spend the money buying regular ammunition than have my husband hurt. He's pretty analytical so he doesn't make impulse buys.

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  2. I think you are in a really good financial place. Split the money, and you each do what you want. If he spends it on a gun....then so be it. If you choose to save it, then that is your choice. We are so far from this dilemma, consider yourself thankful to even consider the idea that you can spend it.

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    1. Thank you, Mysti. Yes, we are thankful to be in this position.

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  3. Personally I think planned indulgences are a good thing, but only you know what is an acceptable amount of indulgence works for you. Possibly you could save half of the return then split the remainder and you could both use your 4th for whatever is important to you. But then I have no idea what to do with a return. We have always tried to keep our withholdings set so we owe nothing but have little if any returned to us. I just don't like the idea of giving the government my money to use w/o benefitting from interest earnings

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    1. Our taxes are always wonky because my commissions are considered bonuses so they are taxed at 25% regardless. I could claim less but we had to pay in a couple years back so I would rather be safe.

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    2. I understand not wanting to have to pay . We generally know a year in advance about what the income for the year will be, but we hve had a couple of heavy bonus years that surprised us. (translation: taxed us to death)

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  4. I totally understand the fear of the reloading bullets. If I was in your position I would try to talk my husband into buying new ammo. I do agree with the other commenters, you should spurge from time to time (if you are in a good financial position which you are!) because other wise there is debt payoff/saving fatigue.

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  5. Yup. The forced frugality gets old after a while. Why save and scrimp if you don't get to enjoy it?

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  6. At first I was going to comment that some balance might be good, and it's okay to spend sometimes. Then I read your comment about the safety issue and I understand completely. I wonder if there is some sort of compromise there?

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